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Adobe Revamps Terms of Service to Assure Customers: No AI Training on Their Work

Adobe revamps terms of service to clarify that it will not train AI on customers' work. New terms of service to be implemented on June 18th. Customers feared that a previous update would allow their work to be used for AI training.

The company wishes to explain that it will not use client work to train artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms. The decision follows a week of backlash from customers who were concerned that a recent amendment to Adobe's terms of service would allow their work to be utilised for AI training.


The new terms of service, set to roll out on June 18th, seek to provide better clarity on what Adobe can and cannot do with customers' work. David Wadhwani, Adobe's president of digital media, stated, "We have never trained generative AI on our customers' content, we have never taken ownership of a customer's work, and we have never allowed access to customer content beyond what's legally required."


The dispute developed when users misinterpreted Adobe's ambiguous language in the terms of service update to suggest that the business could freely access and use their work to train its generative AI models. However, Adobe's policies on AI training did not change. Adobe's chief product officer, Scott Belsky, said that the wording was imprecise and emphasised the significance of trust and openness.


Wadhwani acknowledged that the terminology used in Adobe's terms of service was never meant to allow AI training on client work. He admitted that the corporation could have modernised and defined the terms sooner, restricting them to reflect their real practices and given more detailed explanations of their legal needs.


Adobe has been under fire from the creative community for their purported industry monopoly, subscription-based pricing strategies, and use of generative AI. To address ethical issues, the company trained its Firefly AI model on Adobe Stock photos, open-source information, and public domain content. However, some artists have discovered photos referencing their work on Adobe's stock platform, raising concerns about the safeguards in place.


Wadhwani expressed trust in the content moderation of Adobe Stock and Firefly training data, but admitted that it would never be flawless. Adobe has measures in place to remove anything that violates its policies from Firefly's training data, and consumers can opt out of automatic systems intended to improve the company's services.

 
  • Adobe revamps terms of service to clarify that it will not train AI on customers' work

  • New terms of service to be implemented on June 18th

  • Customers feared that a previous update would allow their work to be used for AI training


Source: THE VERGE

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