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Warning: 26 Billion Records Leak Exposes Dropbox, LinkedIn, and Twitter Users

A massive data leak has exposed 26 billion records, making it the largest breach to date. Platforms like Dropbox, LinkedIn, and Twitter are among those affected. The leaked data is likely a compilation of previous breaches and leaks.

Security researchers have issued a stark warning about a massive data leak that has exposed a staggering 26 billion records. Dubbed the "mother of all breaches," this supermassive data leak is believed to be the largest ever discovered.


The database, which spans a whopping 12 terabytes, was uncovered by researchers from Security Discovery and CyberNews. They suspect that the malicious actor or data broker behind this compilation of leaked data could exploit it for various nefarious purposes, including identity theft, sophisticated phishing schemes, targeted cyberattacks, and unauthorised access to personal and sensitive accounts.


Among the affected platforms and services are Chinese messaging giant Tencent, social media platform Weibo, as well as popular platforms like Twitter, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Adobe, Canva, and Telegram. Alarmingly, the researchers also found records from several US and other government organisations.


Fortunately, most of the data in this database appears to be from previous breaches and leaks, with a high likelihood of duplicate records. However, the inclusion of usernames and password combinations is still cause for concern. Experts predict a surge in credential stuffing attacks in the coming weeks as cybercriminals capitalise on this leaked information.


Jake Moore, a global cybersecurity advisor at ESET, emphasises the importance of taking immediate action in response to this breach. He advises victims to change their passwords, remain vigilant against phishing emails, and enable two-factor authentication on all their accounts, regardless of whether they have been directly affected.

In response to the discovery, LinkedIn, Dropbox, and Twitter/X have been contacted for statements. While Dropbox is currently addressing the inquiry, Twitter/X responded with a busy message. A LinkedIn spokesperson stated that they are fully investigating the claims and have found no evidence of a breach.


Security experts have weighed in on the implications of this massive data leak. Adam Pilton, a cybersecurity consultant at CyberSmart, highlights the need for individuals to change their passwords and enable two-factor authentication. Josh Hickling, a principal consultant at Pentest People, warns of potential phishing attacks exploiting fear around the breach. Richard Bird, the chief security officer of Traceable AI, criticises the lack of national data privacy laws and consequences for companies that mishandle data.


To check if your email address has been leaked in previous instances, you can use the free leak checker tool provided by CyberNews. By practicing good credential hygiene, such as using strong and unique passwords and enabling two-factor authentication, users can protect themselves from potential attacks. If you haven't already, now is the perfect time to prioritise your online security.

 
  • A massive data leak has exposed 26 billion records, making it the largest breach to date.

  • Platforms like Dropbox, LinkedIn, and Twitter are among those affected.

  • The leaked data is likely a compilation of previous breaches and leaks.


Source: FORBES

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