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  • Kyle Chua

Sony, AP Complete Testing of In-Camera Authenticator Combatting Fake Imagery

Updated: Dec 17, 2023

The surging accessibility of generative artificial intelligence (AI) has made it hard to determine whether the images we find online are real or fake.

Sony
Credits: Reuters

For this reason, Sony teamed up with Associated Press (AP) to develop a technology that'll help authenticate images taken by cameras to to safeguard the authenticity of content and provide an extra layer of security to aid news agencies in the fight against fake imagery.


The partnership recently announced that it has completed the second round of testing for the technology, an in-camera digital authenticator that facilitates the creation of a birth certificate for images, validating the origin of the content. The technology provides a machine-based digital signature, removing the opportunity for undetected manipulation from the very beginning. That digital signature is made inside the camera at the moment of capture in the hardware chipset.


"The dissemination of false information and images has real world social impact that brings harm not only to our photojournalist and news agency partners, but to society as a whole," said Neal Manowitz, President and COO of Sony Electronics. "We care deeply about this challenge and are committed to using our resources to help solve it."


Sony and AP’s latest field test was completed in October 2023. During that test, both the capture authentication and workflow process were reportedly evaluated. To accomplish this, Sony worked with Camera Bits, the company behind the workflow tool Photo Mechanic.

Sony
Sony Alpha 9 III. Credits: Sony

"We appreciate the significant challenge that manipulated imagery poses for our partners, and we are highly motivated to play a role in helping solve it," said Dennis Walker, President and Founder of Camera Bits. "Photo Mechanic has been used by the photojournalism industry for 25 years and continues to evolve as the industry introduces new technology."


Sony plans to roll out its new in-camera signature and C2PA authentication as part of a firmware update in the newly announced Alpha 9 III, Alpha 1 and Alpha 7S III sometime in the Spring of 2024.

 
  • Sony has teamed up with AP to develop a technology that'll help authenticate images taken by cameras to to safeguard the authenticity of content.

  • The partnership recently announced that it has completed the second round of testing for the technology, an in-camera digital authenticator that facilitates the creation of a birth certificate for images, validating the origin of the content.

  • Sony plans to roll out its new in-camera signature and C2PA authentication as part of a firmware update in the newly announced Alpha 9 III, Alpha 1 and Alpha 7S III sometime in the Spring of 2024.

 







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